The Necessity of Non‑Medical Evidence

There is no question that medical evidence is the most important component of a Social Security disability claim, however, non‑medical evidence can play an important role and can persuade an administrative law judge that the claimant is unable to perform and complete for employment.

Often medical records do not contain a complete picture of an individual’s ability to work.  Unfortunately, it is getting more and more difficult to persuade medical doctors to complete functional and mental residual capacity forms. Even if the claimant is able to obtain Residual Functional Capacity evaluation from a medical doctor, other evidence is still useful.   One type of evidence that is important are work records.  These records could show a pattern of absences due to the medical condition or they may show that the claimant tried to stay employed with a series of jobs that were progressively less demanding.

Testimony from co‑workers and supervisors may also assist in proving a claimant’s inability to perform the requirements of the job.  It is important to show that the claimant is applying for disability only because they are unable to perform the requirements of their past employment or any other employment.  In addition to work records, it is also helpful to obtain statements from family members, neighbors, or friends who are familiar with the claimant’s condition and the limitations that it causes.